Community Guidelines

  • 8 November 2022
  • 3 replies
  • 266 views

Userlevel 6

When you join Threat Modeling Connect, you join a community of threat modeling practitioners from all over the world who believe thorough and widely applied threat modeling is absolutely critical if we want secure technology in the future.

The guidelines below help keep Threat Modeling Connect a helpful, safe, and thriving community for everyone. 

 

Our Mission

Threat Modeling Connect brings together threat modeling practitioners of all experience levels to collaborate, share, grow, and make threat modeling a standard practice.

 

Our Value

Be Generous

We all have a part to play in making this community a better place by stepping up to help others learn and grow in their career without asking for anything in return.

Be Respectful

We relish the diversity of our beliefs, backgrounds, and experiences that broadens our perspectives. Even when we disagree with each other, we do it respectfully.

Be Open-Minded

We’re always curious about new ideas and viewpoints and open to challenging our own assumptions.

 

Code of Conduct

To create an environment that allows our members to collaborate effectively, we adhere to the following guidelines:

Zero tolerance for hate speech, attacks, or bullying

Help us make the community a safe place where everyone and every idea can thrive. We appreciate and sometimes may respectfully challenge different opinions, views, and approaches but never attack the person.

No commercial promotion

Please don’t promote your products or services, or use “direct message” as an acquisition channel. If anyone sends you a message with the intention of acquisition, please send @Shuning a DM and let us know. (That said, if there’s an industry event or resource that you think other community members may benefit from, please DM @Shuning , and let’s discuss!) 

No job postings

Please don’t share job postings (either job wanted or job available) in any forums. We may establish a dedicated area for job postings in the future.

Give more than you take

We believe everyone can be a contributor. New to threat modeling? Your fresh perspective as a beginner may be a precious gift to veterans who’ve been deep in the weeds :)

Always provide the context

Help other members help you by including the relevant context in your posts. For example, “which threat modeling methodology should I choose?” is too general. Including your objectives, priorities, and concerns along with your ask for recommendations will yield more helpful and relevant responses. 
 

⚠️ Content that violates these guidelines can be permanently removed from the community. Users with repeated violations of the guidelines can result in account termination, or have lesser consequences at the discretion of the community manager. If you think that your content doesn't violate the Community Guidelines and either received a flag or was removed in error, you can appeal by emailing us at hello@threatmodelingconnect.com with the subject line: APPEAL.


3 replies

Userlevel 3
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Hi, to help these rules become clearer, I’ve posted a message to linkedin: “I'm getting ready to refresh the video lectures for My Threat Modeling for Security Champs course. What do you think are the essential things that a champ should know about threat modeling? (I'll make the videos that answer your questions freely available.)” Is that ok to post here? It’s commercial, transparent and contextualized. Maybe ok, maybe not ok. I’d love to hear opinions on the commercial-ness of it, so we can find norms that work for the community.

Userlevel 6

Hi, to help these rules become clearer, I’ve posted a message to linkedin: “I'm getting ready to refresh the video lectures for My Threat Modeling for Security Champs course. What do you think are the essential things that a champ should know about threat modeling? (I'll make the videos that answer your questions freely available.)” Is that ok to post here? It’s commercial, transparent and contextualized. Maybe ok, maybe not ok. I’d love to hear opinions on the commercial-ness of it, so we can find norms that work for the community.

Hey Adam! Being transparent by providing the context will be appreciated by the community. To remove the commercial-ness of it, I’d suggest removing the name of the actual course and make it a general topic.

Example: “I’m working on the content for security champion training and would like to hear: what do you think are the essential things that a champion should know about threat modeling? Thanks in advance for your input! Happy to share the content with the community once it’s completed!”

Userlevel 3
Badge

That sounds great, thank you. I’m going to wait for other feedback before I post.

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